Future Citie - Catapult City as Connector

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About

How does the city facilitate physical and digital connectivity?

 
Tier 1 - Top performers
 
Tier 2
 
Tier 3
 
Tier 4
Why it's important

Working practices are changing: more and more business activity takes place in the digital realm and work is increasingly happening out of the office and on the move, in coffee shops and metros, or at meet-ups and events.

Entrepreneurs tend to be early adopters of these new approaches. It is particularly important to them that they can get around a city easily, and that they have high-quality internet access while they do so. The boundaries between digital and physical connectivity are increasingly blurred.

High-performing cities are finding ways to ensure that both types of connectivity are both comprehensive and frictionless.

Cities don’t need to explicitly focus on innovation and entrepreneurship in order to prioritise these policy areas, as improving connectivity plays into a wide range of policy issues. Nevertheless, they are important components of an environment that is conducive to the circulation of new ideas and the growth of young businesses.

What we looked for in cities
Digitally connected
Physically connected
1

Support access to high-speed internet

Broadband speed and fibre availability are vital inputs into any high-growth business.
2

Provide free, public Wi-Fi

Work increasingly happens on the move and access to the internet is fast becoming a universal public good.
3

Ensure the high quality and extent of cycling infrastructure

As start-up ecosystems coalesce in urban centres, cycling infrastructure and public bike hire schemes allow busy entrepreneurs to move quickly around the city.
4

Ensure frictionless and integrated public transport

Integration between different modes of transportation reduces frictional delays and speeds up movement around the city.
Digitally connected
1
Support access to high-speed internet
Broadband speed and fibre availability are vital inputs into any high-growth business.
2
Provide free, public Wi-Fi
Work increasingly happens on the move and access to the internet is fast becoming a universal public good.
Physically connected
3
Ensure the high quality and extent of cycling infrastructure
As start-up ecosystems coalesce in urban centres, cycling infrastructure and public bike hire schemes allow busy entrepreneurs to move quickly around the city.
4
Ensure frictionless and integrated public transport
Integration between different modes of transportation reduces frictional delays and speeds up movement around the city.
INSIGHTS FROM LEADING CITIES
Future Citie - Catapult

Paris has taken a dual approach to connectivity: building up its physical cycling infrastructure and public cycle hire scheme into one of the largest in the world, and promoting free, fast Wi-Fi at more than 260 public places across the city.

Future Citie - Catapult

In 2015, Melbourne introduced the Free Tram Zone in the city centre to get people out of cars and on to the trams. Coupled with free Wi-Fi in the city centre, citizens are able to connect physically and digitally across the city for free.

Future Citie - Catapult

Tallinn has been offering free public Wi-Fi to its visitors and citizens since 2005, not as a goal in itself but because it is seen as a tool that directly benefits the city. Estonia was one of the first countries to establish access to the internet as a human right. It has also been offering free public transport since 2013, the first capital in Europe to do so.